Make, Do and Mend
Make, Do and Mend

The 'Make, Do and Mend' project explored how we might reinvigorate community-based approaches to the repair of clothing and examined the potential roles for online and offline activities to facilitate knowledge exchange, build communities and develop new repair processes and strategies. This interdisciplinary research project was funded by the ‘Imagine’ project’ at Sheffield Hallam University, and bought together researchers from the Communication and Computing, and Art and Design Research Centres, and the Material and Engineering Research Institute. I led the team of researchers that included Professor Alison Adam (sociology), Professor Daniela Petrelli (human-centred design and technology), Dr Karen Vernon-Parry (material science) and Dr Claire Craig (wellbeing).

www.shu.ac.uk/research/c3ri/projects/make-do-and-mend
www.youtube.com/watch?v=isMQHnvosTo

Waste in the City
Waste in the City

Waste in the City was a research project led by Professor Marie O’Mahony and myself, which explored the issue of waste management within our local communities. Focusing on the City of Sydney the project engaged a group of designers from disciplines such as product design, visual communication and fashion design and proposed to encourage behavioural change through a combination of approaches including engaging infographics, product redesign, new social enterprise initiatives, and improved systems management. In understanding the creation of waste in our local communities, the project aimed to expose designers to the direct impact of their industry on their own environment.

www.wasteinthecity.wikispaces.com

Fashioning Now
Fashioning Now

The FASHIONING NOW project comprised of a program of activities that aimed to raise awareness to the problem of textile waste, which is created during the manufacture and use of fashion clothing. Of interest to design students, fashion designers in industry and fashion consumers the project demonstrated how textile waste could be avoided and reduced. Through an exhibition and a symposium, held at the University of Technology Sydney from 28 July – 28 August 2009, a range of public program events, and a website resource, the project featured innovative research projects from Australian and international practitioners. The exhibition later traveled to the Fremantle Arts Centre in WA, in 2010.

www.fashioningnow.com
www.fac.org.au

Journey of an Ornate Sleeve
Journey of an Ornate Sleeve

The traditional fashion and textiles craft skills found in many urban cities contribute to the vitality of our culture. In contemporary society these creative communities struggle to survive amidst a fast moving fashion industry that seeks to produce cut-price fashion at the cost of a localised, specialised industry. These creative industries, now small in scale and often associated to the luxury or high fashion sectors of the industry, have continued to exist through revivals in the hand-made and a resurgence of interest in craftsmanship and skills.

In conjunction with Zoe Sadokierski (illustrator), Steve Woods (screenprinter, Screenhaus) and Helen Parsons (embroiderer) we developed the ornate sleeve project as an example of localised skills working together in a collaborative model of practice. The fashion industry, in cities like Sydney, continue to need the specialised skills and knowledge of these creative communities.

www.screenhaus.com.au

Fashion Craft: Drawn Threads
Fashion Craft: Drawn Threads

"Fashion craft: drawn threads" was a project and exhibition of new contemporary works that emerged from a collaboration between three fashion and textile designers, and members of the Embroiderers’ Guild of NSW.

Working with a dedicated team of members from the Embroiderers’ Guild of NSW, textiles designer Cecilia Heffer, menswear designer Todd Robinson and myself each produced a series of themed contemporary embroidery samples. The sustainability + couture embroidery samples that I created for this project explored the strategy of upcycling. Working with recovered textile waste that was sourced from a local recycling centre on a singular visit, the materials were reconfigured and reworked in order to create new textile concepts that could be applied within the luxury high fashion market. The project was made possible thanks to the dedication and skills of embroiderers: Helen Parsons, Margaret Smith, Jaci Heyman, Dianne Edwards, Lucy Kennedy, Jenny Wyatt and Christine Wiltshire.

www.embroiderersguildnsw.org.au
www.toddrobinson.com.au

Fashion Technology: The Ripcurl Project
Fashion Technology: The Ripcurl Project

Developed between Professor Marie O’Mahony, Michael Ray (Global Chairman of Wetsuits at Ripcurl), and myself, the Ripcurl project explored the re-use of pre- and post consumer textile waste material in the manufacture of new innovative products. The project began with a student design brief that focused on the creation of wearable jackets using off-cuts and irregular sized pieces of neoprene fabric. Furthermore, the students were encouraged to add value to the original neoprene material through innovative design solutions. Resolving how to join smaller pieces of fabric together while developing a garment form was integral to the success of the design and production process. The final garments and textile samplers were exhibited during the Australian Rosemount Fashion Week in Sydney 2009.

www.ripcurlplanet.com

Fragments: Methodologies of making fashion
Fragments: Methodologies of making fashion

Through an examination of the details in fashion garments we can reconsider traditional methods and techniques of fashion making and lead designers to explore new innovations. Since modern living has encouraged us to buy mass-produced clothing, which is inexpensive and of inferior quality, this exhibition aimed to examine the potential in creating high quality, individual or limited edition garments through an exploration of the specialised techniques applied in high fashion. In particular the exhibition suggested that through this method of specialisation the lifecycle of a fashion garment could be extended. Knit designer, Alana Clifton-Cunningham, and myself presented a range of creative responses that aimed to engage and inspire other fashion designers to devise new creative interplays between contemporary fashion practice and sustainable solutions.

www.dab.uts.edu.au
www.alanacliftoncunningham.com